Below100

Police pursuits: Are they worth risk of injury, death?

No comments

Police pursuits: Are they worth risk of injury, death?

An OpEd by Jonathan Farris, Chief Advocate, Pursuit For Change

Hi Mike,

Merry Christmas!

Thanks for an interesting and in-depth story regarding police pursuits in your area. I am encouraged when reporters delve into this national issue.

It is very clear that Richmond Police Department, Wayne County Sheriff’s Office and Indiana State Police all have weak pursuit policies compared with more progressive jurisdictions across the US. Those stronger policies specifically define (and limit) when an officer can and cannot chase.

Over and over and over we listen to chiefs and sheriffs with similarly lacking policies espouse their excellent training and how qualified their officers are to decide when and how long and how far and how fast to pursue. Yet over 90% of pursuits are started after a non violent felony crimes – crimes which were not endangering anyone, like 4-year-old Madilynn Roberts above, UNTIL THE PURSUIT BEGAN

As a result of departments continuing to sanction pursuits for non violent felony crimes and misdemeanor infractions, thousands of innocent citizens are killed and/or maimed annually. Additionally, on average, seven (7) LEOs are killed and scores more are injured. Six (6) officers have been killed in pursuit-related crashes so far in 2018. 

Although there are a handful of states that mandate reporting of pursuit-related deaths, there is still no mandatory 50-State or Federal tracking of police chase-related deaths or injuries.  As a result, we know there are many more pursuit injuries and deaths that are simply tallied as vehicularaccidents.”

Yet dangerous police chases persist like an antibiotic-resistant pandemic. Way too often we hear the exact same comment from departmental leadership, “We feel we’re doing as much as we can.”  But they are NOT.  If they were truly doing “all that they could,” then their pursuit-driving policies would be significantly stronger and they would cease to put their officers and innocent citizen at risk for petty crimes and misdemeanor traffic violations.

At Pursuit For Change and Pursuit Response we are working to highlight and actually do something about this massive public travesty. We are working diligently with state and Federal legislators for:

– Mandatory Federal Statistical Tracking of pursuit injuries and deaths
– Greater grant funding to support law enforcement usage of pursuit reduction technology
– Law enforcement funding for significantly more pursuit driving training
– Pursuit policy modifications including greater inter-jurisdictional policy consistency and movement toward violent felony-only pursuits

Thanks again for your reporting. It is critical that you and other reporters keep asking the difficult questions. Too many folks in the general public have no idea how pervasive the #PoliceChase problem is. And too often they find out TOO LATE – only after a loved one is killed or seriously injured. 

So, to answer your question, non violent felony pursuits ARE SIMPLY NOT worth the risk of injury and death to LEOs and innocent bystanders

 

Police pursuits: Are they worth risk of injury, death?

https://www.pal-item.com/story/news/crime/2018/12/21/police-pursuits-they-worth-risk-injury-death/2383055002/

by Mike Emery (@PI_Emory) (mwemery@pal-item.com)
Updated 9:36 a.m. ET Dec. 21, 2018

RICHMOND, Ind. — A tree occupied space where the white Ford’s passenger side should have been. The flying car had smashed sideways into the tree and wrapped itself partially around the trunk.

It looked horrendous as Richmond Fire Department personnel worked to free a 23-year-old passenger from the vehicle. Haley Caldwell and 4-year-old Madilynn Roberts both sustained serious injuries when the 19-year-old driver, Daniel Zenon Arguijo, lost control of the Ford while leading police on a high-speed pursuit Nov. 30 down U.S. 40. The incident sparked a social-media debate about the value of that pursuit versus the risk associated with it.

The injuries were serious, but not fatal. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case when suspects flee police. And about a third of those who do die aren’t even involved in the pursuits.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released statistics that the United States recorded 7,090 deaths related to police pursuits for the 20-year period from 1996 through 2015. That averages 355 — or nearly one a day — per year. Of those deaths, 88 were law enforcement officers, 4,637 were in the vehicle being chased, 2,088 were in a vehicle not involved and 277 were innocent bystanders.

Which leads to the important question for communities and law enforcement agencies: Are police pursuits worth it?

Richmond Police Department, Wayne County Sheriff’s Office and Indiana State Police all have policies and procedures in place that permit officers to pursue fleeing suspects at the officer’s discretion. Nationwide, some agencies absolutely prohibit vehicle pursuits. Those agencies decided the risks to citizen and officer safety outweigh the need for suspect apprehension.

Accidents, injuries and worse occur regularly nationwide when drivers flee law enforcement and officers choose to pursue. According to the Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics’ analysis of the International Association of Chiefs of Police pursuit database, 15 percent of pursuits end in crashes. The database recorded 5,568 pursuits from 115 agencies from 2009 to 2013. One in every 200 pursuits in the database ended with a fatality, and there were two serious and 10 minor injuries for every 100 pursuits.

Those serious accidents and deaths occur in Wayne County, too.

Police pursuits in Wayne County over the years

A review of Pal Item stories involving police pursuits from 2011 through 2018 revealed 18 chases that ended in crashes. Two of those crashes killed the driver of the fleeing vehicle.

On March 11, 2013, Richmond Police Department pursued a wanted man onto Indiana 227. Even though officers discontinued the pursuit because of weather conditions and the dangerous way the suspect operated his Pontiac, the vehicle left the roadway and struck two trees, killing the driver.

On May 23, 2017, the Indiana State Police pulled over a driver in Henry County, and when the officer suspected impairment and asked the driver to step out of the car, the driver sped off. When entering Wayne County, the Cadillac was speeding enough to fly over a cable barrier in the median into oncoming westbound traffic. A head-on collision with a pickup killed the fleeing driver and injured two people in the pickup.

Even since the Nov. 30 incident, there have been pursuit incidents in Wayne County and Indiana.

A Muncie man escaped one multi-county pursuit of his Ford on Dec. 17, then led another pursuit after state troopers located him in Wayne County. David Reed Shoemaker, 43, lost control of his Ford, which left Mineral Springs Road and came to rest on its side in a wooded area. Shoemaker was not seriously injured.

An Indiana police officer was not as lucky Dec. 12. Hundreds attended Tuesday’s funeral services for Sgt. Benton Bertram, 33, in Charlestown, Indiana. The nine-year veteran of the Charlestown Police Department died when his police vehicle left Indiana 3 in Scott County and struck a tree. According to the online Officer Down Memorial Page, Bertram is the sixth law enforcement officer in the United States to die this year while engaged in a police pursuit.

Officers constantly balance community safety with the need to engage in pursuits or let suspects go

Of the 7,090 deaths related to pursuits from 1996 through 2015, 192 occurred in Indiana and 231 in Ohio. Seven of the Indiana deaths were police officers, 129 were people in the fleeing vehicle, 53 were people in another vehicle and three were bystanders. In Ohio, one was an officer, 100 were in fleeing vehicles, 116 were in other vehicles and 14 were bystanders.

By any count, pursuits pose one of the most dangerous actions police officers face. Officers must constantly balance community safety with the need to pursue. Is the community safe if officers let the suspect go? Is the community safe if officers continue to pursue?

It’s a tough spot with no easy answers.

“We’ll let people go we shouldn’t have,” RPD Chief Jim Branum said, “but it’s better to err on the side of caution.”

Branum said RPD has had 14 vehicle pursuits during 2018. None of those ended in an accident or with injuries.

And that’s how pursuits most often end. The International Association of Chiefs of Police database shows the pursued driver gives up and stops 29 percent of the time and 25 percent end when the police discontinue the pursuit, 17 percent end with the suspect eluding officers, 9 percent end with police intervention and 2 percent end with the suspect vehicle becoming disabled. Those cause no harm; however, the 15 percent that involve collisions do.

And that’s a rate too steep for some. The Bureau of Justice Statistics said an estimated 2 percent of local police forces and 1 percent of sheriff’s offices prohibited vehicle pursuits completely. Allowing a suspect to escape, though, runs against officers’ instincts.

“It’s tough to tell a young policeman to let a violator go, because catching the bad guy is what they’re hired to do,” Branum said. “Then, letting this person go, is that a danger to the public, as well?”

RPD, sheriff’s department and state police policies allow pursuits; however, they list factors an officer should consider when deciding to pursue. The factors include:

The severity of the offense committed by the suspect, which can be complicated by the fact the act of fleeing in a vehicle is a felony itself in Indiana;

  • Whether the suspect can be identified for later arrest;
  • The safety of those involved and the general public;
  • The amount of traffic on the roadway;
  • The time of day;
  • The speeds associated with the pursuit:
  • The road conditions; and
  • The perceived driving ability of the suspect, such as if the driver an inexperienced teenager.

Those factors must continuously be considered as the officer pursues. The three departments also allow officers and supervisors the authority to discontinue a pursuit at any time.

“There are lots of things to consider in a short amount of time,” said Branum, who noted he has discontinued pursuits as a supervisor. “And they’re all things you learned after becoming a police officer.”

The rules also lay out procedures and techniques for the execution of pursuits. All three agencies also then require a review of each pursuit that analyzes justification for the pursuit, the communication involved, the supervisors’ roles, equipment or training needs, disciplinary concerns and policy or procedure revisions.

Sheriff Jeff Cappa said the sheriff’s department policy meets the standards established by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, which has accredited the agency.

“I have a very professional staff, and they’re trained very well,” said Cappa, whose agency was involved in five pursuits during 2017 with no accidents or injuries. “They understand what the job requires in those situations.”

Traffic violations are primary reason why police pursuits begin, but officers often left wondering why suspects flee

The chase of Arguijo that ended with the Ford wrapped around a tree began with Arguijo running a stop sign and nearly striking Patrolman Adam Blanton’s vehicle. Arguijo sped away when Blanton turned to attempt a traffic stop.

That’s the most common reason for pursuits to begin, according to the Chiefs of Police database. Traffic violations trigger 69 percent of the pursuits, including 16 percent for speeding, 13 percent for reckless driving and 12 percent for suspicion of impaired driving. Suspects thought to have committed non-violent felonies — often auto theft — account for 12 percent of the pursuits, violent felonies for 9 percent and misdemeanors for 8 percent.

Pal Item stories about pursuits included those beginning for traffic stops, but officers also pursued a Florida murder suspect, an attempted murder suspect, robbery suspects, break-in suspects, suspects wanted on warrants, counterfeiters and suspected stolen vehicles. Even with traffic stops, there’s reason for officers to wonder why a suspect would commit a felony — the fleeing — to avoid a simple traffic citation.

“You don’t know why the person is fleeing,” Branum said.

During Blanton’s pursuit of Arguijo, the officer showed awareness of the traffic conditions on U.S. 40, which were lighter than expected at the time of the pursuit, and the fact other drivers were aware of Blanton and pulling to the side even before Arguijo reached them, according to an affidavit of probable cause. Blanton also noted he could not get close enough to procure Arguijo’s license plate number and that he was losing ground to Arguijo.

Still, Arguijo lost control when a vehicle pulled out of a shopping center entrance in front of him. Arguijo was later found to be under the influence of methamphetamine when he fled, running six stop signs and five red lights before he crashed. He has been charged with Level 5 felony resisting law enforcement causing serious injury, two counts of Level 6 felony driving under the influence of a controlled substance and causing serious injury, Level 6 felony criminal recklessness with a deadly weapon, Class A misdemeanor operating under the influence of a controlled substance while endangering a person and Class C misdemeanor operating under the influence of methamphetamine.

Shoemaker, who also crashed his Ford, fled to avoid a traffic stop in Muncie. He led police through four counties before his crash west of Centerville. Shoemaker was jailed on charges of Level 5 operating as a habitual traffic violator with a lifetime suspension and Level 6 felony resisting law enforcement.

Both men exceeded 90 miles per hour while they were being chased. The pursuit database shows 23 percent of pursuits topped 90 mph and 45 percent exceeded 70 mph. Wayne County pursuits regularly reach high speeds because of the roads that cross the county, including Interstate 70, U.S. 40, U.S. 35, Indiana 38 and Indiana 1.

Those roads also contribute to pursuits entering the county from other Indiana counties, such as Shoemaker, and from other states. Pal Item stories reflected pursuits that began in Delaware, Randolph, Henry, Union and Marion counties in Indiana, plus Preble and Montgomery counties in Ohio. In those instances, the Wayne County officers assist other agencies. On I-70, Branum said, local officers often are just asked to block exit ramps to keep the pursuit on the highway.

How police pursuits end: from stop sticks to roadblocks and other immobilization techniques

The proximity to the state border also means local pursuits travel into Ohio. Agency policies dictate what pursuits may be continued into Ohio and local officers’ roles once entering the neighboring state.

While the suspect driver in a pursuit might have a destination in mind, leaving pursuing officers “trying to keep up,” Branum said, officers have the advantage of their radios. That’s especially true now that the county has a centralized 911 center that dispatches calls for all county agencies. Dispatchers can communicate with every unit in the county, plus alert neighboring counties and states during a pursuit.

“It’s nearly impossible to outrun the radio, even if you can outrun the car,” Branum said.

The best conclusion to any pursuit is for the fleeing driver to pull over and surrender. Some will bail from their vehicles and attempt to run away from officers, which still is safer than high-speed pursuits. Other than that, officers can use tire deflators (stop sticks), roadblocks and sheer numbers to stop a fleeing vehicle. Only the state police permits precision immobilization techniques where officers use their vehicles to contact the fleeing vehicle, and then only under strict circumstances, such as lower speeds and by trained officers.

“The strategy is that there are enough units in the area so that the driver decides there’s no place to go,” said Branum, who noted stop sticks are never used on fleeing motorcycles that would crash as a result.

Pal Item pursuit stories noted five pursuits that were ended using stop sticks. Other pursuits ended when the fleeing drivers pulled into driveways, abandoned vehicles and ran, plowed into farm fields, traveled into yards, drove through a fence, struck law enforcement vehicles and crashed.

At least two technology-based ideas have been developed to assist officers in pursuits, but neither has become commonly accepted or used.

One idea involves firing a small, adhesive, GPS tag onto a fleeing vehicle from a launcher located behind the police vehicle’s grille. That allows officers to back off and track the suspect vehicle on a computer, delaying the arrest but eliminating a possibly dangerous pursuit. One drawback, however, is that a police vehicle equipped to fire the GPS tag must get close enough to the fleeing vehicle to attach the tag.

Another idea involves using a remote to disable the engine of a fleeing vehicle. Branum said he wonders how the fleeing vehicle would react if the engine suddenly shuts down at high speed.

Of pursuits in the Chiefs of Police database, 57 percent ended within three minutes and 66 percent covered less than three miles. The data shows that the longer a pursuit lasts and when more law enforcement vehicles become involved the likelihood of a crash increases.

Cappa and Branum said their officers are trained in emergency vehicle operation when they attend the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy for their initial training. The state then requires additional annual training in operating emergency vehicles. The training is classroom training and in-car training. Cappa said his officers received both kinds of training this year, while Branum said RPD alternates years between classroom and road training.

The road training, he said, usually is done at the Richmond Municipal Airport on a timed course that tests the necessary skills. Officers drive their day-to-day vehicles when training.

“We feel we’re doing as much as we can,” Branum said.

That training, however, does not make officers, such as Sgt. Bertram, infallible when in pursuit. Also, the drivers fleeing from law enforcement do not receive such training. And their vehicles might not be pursuit ready such as law enforcement pursuit-certified vehicles. Those drivers, much like Arguijo and Shoemaker, can lose control and crash.

In the end, officers must quickly and continuously weigh many factors and reach a decision about engaging in a pursuit.

“I think part of how you combat that is have a policy in place, have guidelines and lay down for the officers that these are the rules,” Branum said. “I think we’ve done well the past three of four years I’ve had reason to monitor it.”

Most times the officer will apprehend a driver who chose to flee, and sometimes that driver will present a clear — if not deadly — danger to society. But other times, suspects, police officers and innocent bystanders will also continue to sustain serious injuries and lose their lives because of police pursuits.

Which leads back to the important question for communities and law enforcement agencies: Are police pursuits worth it?

adminPolice pursuits: Are they worth risk of injury, death?
read more

Opinion: Milwaukee Gambles with Citizen and Officer Lives

2 comments

Opinion: Milwaukee Gambles with Citizen and Officer Lives

by Jonathan Farris
Chief Advocate, Pursuit For Change
December 10, 2018

On Thursday, December 6, the Milwaukee Police Department announced that carjackings were down and @Fox6Now Milwaukee  reported that “police credit change in pursuit policy for dramatic decrease in carjackings.”  This is a story about the City of Milwaukee and their quest to reduce joyriding and stolen vehicles. It is an honorable mission, but they are using a very deadly battle plan.

In this recent story, please note this critical statistic. “In 2017, there were 386 pursuits. As of Dec. 6, 2018, there had been more than 800.”  MPD is on its way to over 900 pursuits this year. That means officers and innocent citizens will have been placed in harm’s way +500 times more in 2018 than in 2017.

That ought to scare anyone who lives in or near the city or ever visits Milwaukee. These stats mean there will be, on average, EIGHTEEN chases per week.

There are other glaring omissions in this news story.

First, as I understand the previous MPD vehicular pursuit policy, in place before the MFPC mandated now-retired Chief Flynn to weaken it, that policy specifically permitted pursuits for carjacked vehicles because carjacking is a crime of violence. Therefore, to assert that pursuits for traffic violations impact the number of carjackings is false.

Second, it’s critical to understand there is no causal relationship between increased pursuits for misdemeanor traffic violation and non-violent felonies and any reduction in carjackings (which are violent felonies).

Third, well before MPD’s pursuit policy was weakened, carjackings were on a downward track. From 2015-2017, carjackings went down 21% and from 2016 to 2017, the reduction was 12%. *

Finally, and of greatest importance, we have already forgotten about those who were killed and injured in these 2018 chases. It seems like personal tragedies end up as so much collateral damage, forgotten before the wreckage is cleaned from the street.

But I will not forget. Ever. It’s personal. Here are just a few of the horrible outcomes that these 2018 increased police chases have caused in Milwaukee. Note that the first three of these, each with the death of an officer or innocent, were pursuits as the result of non-violent felonies and traffic violations.

Milwaukee police officer killed, another injured in squad car crash.  STORY HERE
Reason for pursuit – “reckless operation violation” and not a violent crime.
A Milwaukee police officer was killed Thursday and a fellow officer was injured when their squad car crashed while chasing another vehicle, authorities said. The death of Officer Charles Irvine Jr., 23, was confirmed during an evening news conference by Milwaukee police Chief Alfonso Morales.

Innocent citizen killed by driver fleeing police.  STORY HERE
Reason for pursuit – “reckless operation violation” and not a violent crime.
A 65-year-old woman, who was the front passenger of the Hyundai, suffered fatal injuries during the accident. The Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office has identified her as Sylvia Tiwari. “She was like a mother, a mentor, a pastor. When they took her, they definitely took a part of me,” said a co-worker of Tiwari.
Debris in the road belonged to the car that was carrying Tawari and her daughter Latrece Hughes, now in critical condition.

‘This was horrific:’ 1 dead, 2 seriously injured after police pursuit ends in crash.  STORY HERE
Reason for pursuit – “reckless operation violation” and not a violent crime.
A police pursuit on Milwaukee’s south side led to a deadly rollover crash. One person died and a 20-year-old man and a 22-year-old woman, were seriously injured during the accident. They were both taken to a hospital for medical care.

3 in custody after police pursuit, crash involving taxi in Milwaukee.  STORY HERE
Reason for pursuit – “reckless operation violation”. Pursuing officers were unaware of possible earlier criminal activity.  
A high-speed pursuit with Milwaukee police ended in a violent crash near 27th and Hadley. The fleeing driver crashed into a taxi. Three people in the taxi were taken to the hospital.

There are more stories, more unsuspecting citizens and more courageous officers who will be caught up in the insanity of Milwaukee’s increased pursuits of non-violent felony offenders. According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a nonprofit group that has long tracked officer fatalities, published that “over the past 20 years, traffic-related incidents have been the number one cause of officer fatalities.” And sadly, as of 2018 Officer Irvine is a member of that group.

Milwaukee can do better – just ask other cities that invested in training and technology to reduce deaths and injuries related to pursuits. And as I said in an August 31, 2018 article, Mayor Tom Barrett and the Common Council have approved funding  for additional technology tools to be used by MPD. Yet nothing has been done with those funds.

Until saner minds prevail, I will most certainly be reporting more of Milwaukee’s police chase deaths and serious injuries and the lawsuits that will follow.

*Office of Management Analysis & Planning, Milwaukee Police Department, 12/29/2017


Click for Milwaukee’s Fox 6 News report.  ORIGINAL STORY or ORIGINAL VIDEO

‘No one deserves it:’ Police credit change in pursuit policy for dramatic decrease in carjackings

MILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Police Department announced on Thursday, Dec. 6 a decrease in carjackings within the city. Police credited a change in the pursuit policy — with officers going after stolen cars and reckless drivers more often.

In 2017, there were 386 pursuits. As of Dec. 6, 2018, there had been more than 800.

Bianca Williams

“Some people thought they were just joyriding. Like, I could just ride around,” said Bianca Williams, Stop the Stollies.

Williams said there are carjackers in her family.

“Some of them got jail time,” said Williams.

That’s why Williams started “Stop the Stollies,” a campaign aimed at educating young people about the seriousness of stealing cars.

“Some of them get the (GPS) bracelet and really learned the hard way,” said Williams.

Michael Brunson

For those who end up losing control and crashing, the reality is even more harsh.

“So many young folks are losing their lives and others are losing their lives behind this senseless crime,” Williams said.

Milwaukee police said they are starting to see success in curbing carjackings. Police said public education, police patrols and investigation are helping.

“To go after those individuals who are prone and have committed these types of crimes in the past — so what we do is, we collaborate and focus on these individuals in order to interdict and capture them soon after we commit these crimes or turn into a spree,” said Assistant Chief Michael Brunson, Milwaukee Police Department.

Police said if you look at November carjackings for the past three years, they are down 59 percent. Since 2015, the average has been 56 a year. In November 2018, there were 23.

Steve Caballero

“Trying to hold kids more accountable. Again, it’s a good working relationship between the police department, our Criminal Investigation Bureau, our patrol people at the children’s center, the district attorney’s office — holding kids accountable for their actions,” said Assistant Chief Steve Caballero, Milwaukee Police Department.

One of the biggest factors in the decrease, according to police, is the fact that carjackers are getting the message that the police pursuit police has changed. Police do chase stolen cars and reckless drivers.

“God knows it’s been really hard, especially with the older population. They’ve been assaulted and different things. No one deserves that. Younger, older, no one deserves it,” said Williams.

Police said the community has been an important piece of the effort –and they do follow up on your tips.

adminOpinion: Milwaukee Gambles with Citizen and Officer Lives
read more

Officers Suspended for Bad Pursuit

No comments

Thanks Chief. A difficult decision, I’m sure. But necessary to change the culture and to save bystander and officer lives.

Original Article here: http://www.tampabay.com/news/pinellas/clearwater/clearwater-cops-suspended-for-unauthorized-car-chase-20180926/

Clearwater cops suspended for unauthorized car chase

by Kathryn Varn (@kathrynvarn)

CLEARWATER — Police Chief Dan Slaughter suspended two officers and a detective after an internal investigation found an unauthorized car chase led to a crash that hurt an officer and two civilians.

Det. Frederick Lise, who led the pursuit after a stolen car drove away from a traffic stop in Largo, got 10 days suspension for violating two policies related to operating department vehicles and insubordination and candor. He will also be removed from the agency’s Special Enforcement Unit.

Officers Langston Woodie and Jesse Myers, the latter of whom was hurt in the crash at Rosery Road and Clearwater-Largo Road, were handed five days of suspension for violating the agency’s operating department vehicles policy. Woodie will also be removed from the Community Problem Response Team.

“We are sorry that a civilian got hurt. We’re concerned that our own employee got hurt,” Slaughter said. “We recognize we’ve made some errors here that we’re responsible for.”

The officers and detective could not be reached for comment.

One of the injured civilians, Zoe Applegate, declined to comment through her St. Petersburg lawyer, Sean McQuaid. But McQuaid said Applegate, 20, broke her wrist and underwent emergency wrist surgery at Bayfront Health St. Petersburg. She also had multiple broken ribs and head and neck injuries. Her 2015 Chevy Cruze was totaled, he said.

“It was an extremely serious accident,” McQuaid said. “They had a green light and the officer just went right through the stoplight … It had to be a traumatic impact and a surprise to her.”

The passenger in her car, William Gamble, could not be reached for comment. His lawyer did not return a call requesting comment.

According to the internal investigation, a woman reported that her black Ford Expedition had been stolen at 9:25 p.m. May 29 from the Ross Norton Recreation Complex on S Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. About 23 minutes later, Lise, who was hired in 2014, saw the stolen car and started following as it traveled south on Missouri Avenue from Druid Road. Woodie, who was hired in 2016, and Myers, who was hired in 2007, drove up to help. A fourth officer positioned himself down the road to throw tire deflation sticks if needed.

The car pulled into a Wawa on Missouri Avenue just north of Rosery Road in Largo, according to the investigation. The officers tried to conduct a traffic stop, but the Expedition got away and pulled out of the Wawa.

What they should have done at that point, Slaughter said, was stop following the car, head back to the city and notify Largo police. Under Clearwater police policy, typically only violent felonies warrant a pursuit. A stolen car does not.

“It’s tough to do. I’ll admit it,” the chief said. “You get in this profession to try to catch bad guys, so as a police officer it’s very difficult to turn around and go the other direction, but it’s for good reason that this policy exists.”

Instead, the officers chased the car west on Rosery Road and through a red light at the intersection of Clearwater-Largo Road. None had their lights and sirens on — another problem, had the pursuit been authorized to begin with, Slaughter said.

“Even if a person had a misunderstanding on what he could or couldn’t do, there’s no excuse for not utilizing lights and sirens when following a vehicle like that,” the chief said.

Lise, Woodie and the driver of the stolen car made it through. Myers collided with Applegate’s car, heading south on Clearwater-Largo Road, in the intersection. His last recorded speed before the crash was 42 mph.A bystander told investigators he ran up to Myers’ car and started pounding on the door. The officer wasn’t responsive at first. When he came to, his first instinct was to check on the civilians in the other car and his police dog, Axe.

Applegate and Gamble were taken to Bayfront. Myers was treated at Morton Plant Hospital. Axe was checked out and cleared at an animal hospital.

Meanwhile, Lise and Woodie continued after the stolen car until it stopped at 18th Street SW and 10th Avenue SW. The occupants got out of the car and ran away. A suspect was later arrested after investigators found DNA and fingerprints linking him to the car.

All three officers said in interviews with investigators that they believe they violated the pursuit policy. Lise, who is also a member of a multi-department habitual offender monitoring task force, got an additional 5-day suspension because he didn’t keep his supervisors in both the task force and Clearwater police fully informed on what was happening.

It put the other two officers, knowing Lise was in the task force with other supervisors, “in a little bit of a quandary,” Slaughter said.

Times senior researcher Caryn Baird contributed to this report. Contact Kathryn Varn at (727) 893-8913 or kvarn@tampabay.com. Follow @kathrynvarn.

adminOfficers Suspended for Bad Pursuit
read more

Reducing police pursuits while supporting LEO’s

No comments

Original article located at the Pursuit Response website
http://www.pursuitresponse.org/reducing-police-pursuits-supporting-leos/

Reducing police pursuits while supporting LEO’s

By Jonathan Farris, Chief Advocate, Pursuit for Change

Vehicular chases and police pursuit policies are issues often left on the back burner until a bystander or officer is injured or killed. I know this all too well.

While recently speaking to a group of Madison Police Department (WI) recruits, I was once again overcome with emotion remembering why I began this mission to reduce police pursuits for non-violent felonies. My son, Paul, a 23-year-old innocent bystander, was killed during a police chase into a city with a very restrictive policy. My presentation to these Madison recruits was part of my Pursuit For Change work (PursuitForChange.org) in conjunction with the Below100 initiative (Below100.org), a campaign to reduce preventable law enforcement officer line of duty deaths.

After my recruit presentation, as well as after other presentations to more experienced LEOs, many officers approached me to offer thanks for sharing my story. These officers get it; they understand my heart ache. They understand why I’m there, and why I dedicate so much effort to save lives of officers and bystanders like Paul.

Jon Farris presenting to Madison Police Department (WI) recruits

Jon Farris presenting to Madison Police Department (WI) recruits

After several years as Chairman of the Board for the national non-profit, PursuitSAFETY, I made a decision to move in a slightly different direction. I wanted to provide information and value to LEOs across the country. I wanted to share my story directly with legislators in Washington. I wanted to find additional funding for LEO’s use of pursuit reduction technologies and increased officer driving training. I wanted to implement mandatory tracking for all police chase-related deaths and injuries. And finally, I wanted to work toward safer and more consistent pursuit policies. So, as a result, I established Pursuit For Change.

Police Pursuits

Scores of high-speed police pursuits occur daily and there is definitely no shortage of media coverage. The more brazen and deadly the pursuit, the more news coverage it gets. Society sensationalizes police pursuits, and regardless of the horrific consequences, the media feeds their thirst to be entertained. In-car videos of dangerous stunts at high speeds followed by pictures of marred vehicles are exactly the type of coverage affecting the public’s mindset. People have become desensitized to police chases; for the most part, they are unaware of the tragic effects of the high-speed pursuits they watch.

Police pursuits kill an average of one person each day, according to the National Institute of Justice statistics. While the majority of pursuit-related deaths are suspects, an innocent bystander is killed every three days and a law enforcement officer is killed every six weeks. Even without mandatory reporting for pursuit-related deaths and injuries, data from an FBI report stated that thousands of people are injured in police chases every year.

Taken at a state level, the numbers look just as grim. An NBC Los Angeles report shed light on the prevalence of police pursuit-related injuries in the state of California. Between 2002 and 2012, over 10,000 people were injured in police chases, with 321 ending as fatalities. In 2011 alone, pursuits in California resulted in 927 injuries and 33 deaths. Included in those deaths were eight bystanders and one police officer. Other states have equally unacceptable results.

The toll from pursuits is not only measured in lives. A 2016 NBC investigation of Chicago-area pursuits found that taxpayers paid out over $95 million in civil settlements and judgments stemming from 24 separate lawsuits over a 10-year period. That same report counted nearly a dozen more pending lawsuits that had not been settled. So it is realistic to estimate that the sum of pursuit-related settlements in the Chicago area will exceed $100 million over a 10-year period. How many more officers and equipment could be funded by sums such as this?

Keep in mind that these police chase numbers are gathered without any rigorous Federal system in place to mandatorily report pursuit-related injuries, deaths and economic damages. From other studies completed, it is reasonable to predict that actual numbers are significantly higher. A standardized system for reporting pursuit-related injuries, deaths, and damages would be monumental in analyzing and significantly reducing those avoidable pursuits resulting in so much loss and suffering.

Police pursuits with deadly outcomes are nothing new; for many years, LEO and bystander lives have been lost and forever changed as a result. Police chases are a national issue with staggering local effects, yet the problem has largely fallen on deaf ears.

My Mission

My son died during a high-speed police chase in 2007. Paul and his girlfriend Katelyn were headed home when an SUV crashed into the taxicab in which they were passengers. Paul and the cab driver, Walid Chahine, died; Katelyn sustained serious, life-altering injuries. This double fatality police pursuit began over a misdemeanor traffic violation – when the driver of the SUV made an illegal U-turn.

Paul and Katelyn

Question: Is it worth risking innocent bystander lives and police officer lives over minor traffic violations such as failing to yield at a stop sign or an illegal U-turn?

That’s tough to answer because officers do have a duty to enforce the law, but while protecting citizens. Achieving both obligations – enforcement and protection – is extremely challenging. Common sense dictates that engaging in any pursuit should be limited to only the most dangerous and violent offenders. In the heat of the moment that can be a difficult decision for the officer unless their EVO pursuit policy is clear, concise and unambiguous. Most EVO and pursuit policies that I have reviewed do not meet these standards.

At the time of Paul’s death, many people were affected. My neighbor and good friend, Tim Dolan, was one of those.

“While in office, lowering violent crimes and protecting the citizens of Minneapolis was a primary focus,” said retired Minneapolis Police Chief Tim Dolan. “The greatest risk of serious injuries to police and the public come from police chases or pursuits. This is a national issue. I strongly believe in what Jon is doing; I hope agencies take notice and start working to change their policies around pursuits.” – Tim Dolan, Chief of Police (Ret.), Minneapolis, MN

Pursuit Reduction Technology

There are alternatives to chasing. Examples include GPS tracking technology, driving simulator training, emergency smartphone alerts to drivers in the vicinity of an active pursuit, and other measures. Each of these options can be used to apprehend suspects while reducing the likelihood of civilian or officer injuries or deaths.

I have been working tirelessly to find alternatives that will limit pursuits for all but the most heinous of violent crimes. Technology is now a reality and police departments across the country are beginning to consider this in conjunction with stricter policies for their officers.

Unlike many advocates, I am not at odds with law enforcement. Rather, I understand that we have a common goal. I truly appreciate the challenge that law enforcement officers face. I provide information and support relating to reducing chases and making apprehending these criminals safer. I speak for many who have been adversely impacted by a police pursuit, to raise attention to the issue and to highlight the need for alternatives to high-speed pursuits for non-violent crimes.

No family should endure the lifetime pain caused by an avoidable disaster. I hope to minimize incidents when split-second decisions and adrenaline-fueled moments can end tragically, as it did for my Paul.

Pursuit for Change

Our goal is twofold: protect innocent civilians’ lives and protect officer lives. To accomplish this mission, I created Pursuit for Change, a national police pursuit advocacy group. The focus of Pursuit for Change is to push policy, legislation, technology and training to save innocent citizen and police officer lives. Rational pursuit policies coupled with advanced pursuit management technologies and increased training will decrease pursuit-related deaths and injuries.

The reality is that implementing these changes can be just that simple. Although increased training and advanced technologies are proven to reduce the risks involved in pursuits, many law enforcement agencies are unable to acquire necessary equipment because of budgetary constraints. Pursuit for Change is working with members of Congress to help police departments and law enforcement agencies receive necessary funding to adopt safer tactics.

Pursuit for Change is lobbying for a federally funded program for pursuit reduction technology and LEO driving training. Our efforts have united Senate and House representatives on both sides of the aisle.

Our work is also at the local level. My meetings with city and state law enforcement agencies are examples of affecting change at the source. Pursuit for Change is gearing up to work with even more agencies and departments to raise awareness and pursue meaningful change.

Future of Police Pursuits

Imagine a world where every day one more person’s life is saved, every three days one more innocent bystander’s life is saved, and every six weeks one police officer’s life is saved. In this world, police departments have adopted the latest and safest technologies with officer training and internal policies to match. This is a world in which dangerous chases are limited to the most extreme circumstances.

The ideal situation, of course, is to get bad guys off the streets without harming anyone else in the process. The better equipped and trained departments are, the more often they apprehend criminals without incident. We all need to remember that a LEO’s goal and obligation is to carry out their duty to protect and serve while ensuring the safety of bystanders, other officers and themselves.

Saving lives begins with awareness and education. Through the grief of thousands of anguished families and friends, we must support law enforcement while finding and implementing options other than chasing every runner. Officers put their lives on the line every day. It’s up to their command to find every possible means to reduce these risks. Increased training and enhanced technologies will most certainly reduce avoidable outcomes that adversely affect communities and law enforcement agencies alike.

The time is now to prevent other families, innocent bystanders, and police officers from having to suffer as my family has from easily preventable tragedies.

My journey started with horrible sadness and anger. But I continue to focus those emotions into something beneficial and desperately needed for society. I have focused my sadness into an appreciation for the challenges faced by law enforcement. However, I will continue to drive home my message that there are altogether way too many unnecessary pursuits, and LEOs must reassess their direction and policies.

I have focused my pain and heartache into a relentless, but positive pursuit for change.

 

Jonathan Farris is founder and Chief Advocate for Pursuit For Change, an advocacy working to change federal and local pursuit policies by seeking legislation to more effectively track and manage dangerous police chases and helping law enforcement implement pursuit reduction technology. Learn more at pursuitforchange.org.

adminReducing police pursuits while supporting LEO’s
read more

Too Many Police Chases End This Way

No comments

We know there are so many safer means for apprehending drivers who flee from police. We need law enforcement to embrace new technology and safer tactics.

POLICE PURSUIT STARTS IN LEHI, ENDS WITH ROLLOVER OF BLUFFDALE OFFICER’S AUTO

Author Deanna Wagner
30 April, 2017

A Bluffdale police officer suffered minor injuries after his auto crashed and rolled on Interstate 15 in Sandy during a vehicle chase on Saturday.

Sgt. Todd Royce of the Utah Highway Patrol said the pursuit began in Lehi and the suspect fled north on I-15 at high speeds.

Only minor injuries for the Bluffdale officer. “But it looks like the Bluffdale officer rolled down through a lower area of I-15 and ended up being on his top in the emergency lane”.

The Bluffdale officer, who Royce said only suffered minor injuries, was transported to a hospital as a precautionary measure. It was not clear why police initially attempted to stop the vehicle. And we don’t know exactly what happened.

The suspect is still outstanding, he said, but Lehi police believe they know who the suspect is and they are now looking for him.

The pursuit was terminated immediately after the crash in order to render aid to the Bluffdale officer.

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE:
http://appsforpcdaily.com/2017/04/police-pursuit-starts-in-lehi-ends-with-rollover-of/

adminToo Many Police Chases End This Way
read more

Too Many LEO Deaths

No comments

Last night yet another police officer was gunned down by a man using children as a shield. http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/01/us/tacoma-officer-shot/

This officer represents the 132nd LEO killed in 2016, and there is still a month left in the year. I really hope more people begin to get riled up about the loss of police officers’ lives, too, because it and they truly matter.

So, just in case you don’t know how bad it is, take a moment to read the names of the WAY TOO MANY officers killed in the line of duty in 2016 (listing from www.ODMP.org as of this morning). Please visit the Officer Down Memorial Page website to learn much more.

Pray for their families and friends, whose lives will NEVER be the same…

@Below100 @Pursuit4Change #StopTheViolence #ODMP

 
Arlington County Police Department, Virginia
Corporal Harvey Snook, III
Arlington County Police Department, VA
EOW: Thursday, January 14, 2016
Cause of Death: 9/11 related illness
 
Danville Police Department, Ohio
Police Officer Thomas W. Cottrell, Jr.
Danville Police Department, OH
EOW: Sunday, January 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Unified Police Department of Greater Salt Lake, Utah
Police Officer Douglas Scott Barney, II.
Unified Police Department of Greater Salt Lake, UT
EOW: Sunday, January 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Illinois
Correctional Officer Adam Conrad
Marion County Sheriff’s Office, IL
EOW: Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Government
Special Agent Scott McGuire
United States Department of Homeland Security – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – Homeland Security Investigations, US
EOW: Sunday, January 24, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Seaside Police Department, Oregon
Sergeant Jason Goodding
Seaside Police Department, OR
EOW: Friday, February 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Mesa County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado
Deputy Sheriff Derek Geer
Mesa County Sheriff’s Office, CO
EOW: Monday, February 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Tulare County Sheriff’s Office, California
Deputy Sheriff Scott Ballantyne
Tulare County Sheriff’s Office, CA
EOW: Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Aircraft accident
 
Harford County Sheriff’s Office, Maryland
Senior Deputy Mark F. Logsdon
Harford County Sheriff’s Office, MD
EOW: Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Harford County Sheriff’s Office, Maryland
Senior Deputy Patrick B. Dailey
Harford County Sheriff’s Office, MD
EOW: Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Riverdale Police Department, Georgia
Major Gregory E. Barney
Riverdale Police Department, GA
EOW: Thursday, February 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Fargo Police Department, North Dakota
Police Officer Jason Moszer
Fargo Police Department, ND
EOW: Thursday, February 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Mississippi Department of Public Safety – Bureau of Narcotics, Mississippi
Special Agent Lee Tartt
Mississippi Department of Public Safety – Bureau of Narcotics, MS
EOW: Saturday, February 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Park County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado
Corporal Nate Carrigan
Park County Sheriff’s Office, CO
EOW: Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Prince William County Police Department, Virginia
Officer Ashley Marie Guindon
Prince William County Police Department, VA
EOW: Saturday, February 27, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Las Animas County Sheriff’s Office, Colorado
Deputy Sheriff Travis Russell
Las Animas County Sheriff’s Office, CO
EOW: Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Euless Police Department, Texas
Police Officer David Stefan Hofer
Euless Police Department, TX
EOW: Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
South Jacksonville Police Department, Illinois
Police Officer Scot Fitzgerald
South Jacksonville Police Department, IL
EOW: Friday, March 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
New Jersey State Police, New Jersey
Trooper Sean E. Cullen
New Jersey State Police, NJ
EOW: Tuesday, March 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office, Florida
Deputy Sheriff John Robert Kotfila, Jr.
Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office, FL
EOW: Saturday, March 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
California Highway Patrol, California
Officer Nathan Taylor
California Highway Patrol, CA
EOW: Sunday, March 13, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Prince George’s County Police Department, Maryland
Police Officer I Jacai D. Colson
Prince George’s County Police Department, MD
EOW: Sunday, March 13, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire (Accidental)
 
El Paso Police Department, Texas
Patrolman David Ortiz
El Paso Police Department, TX
EOW: Monday, March 14, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
West Virginia State Police, West Virginia
First Sergeant Joseph G. Portaro
West Virginia State Police, WV
EOW: Monday, March 14, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
Massachusetts State Police, Massachusetts
Trooper Thomas L. Clardy
Massachusetts State Police, MA
EOW: Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Greenville Police Department, South Carolina
Police Officer III Allen Lee Jacobs
Greenville Police Department, SC
EOW: Friday, March 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Howard County Sheriff’s Office, Indiana
Deputy Sheriff Carl A. Koontz
Howard County Sheriff’s Office, IN
EOW: Sunday, March 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Des Moines Police Department, Iowa
Police Officer Susan Louise Farrell
Des Moines Police Department, IA
EOW: Saturday, March 26, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Des Moines Police Department, Iowa
Police Officer Carlos Puente-Morales
Des Moines Police Department, IA
EOW: Saturday, March 26, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Texas Department of Public Safety – Texas Highway Patrol, Texas
Trooper Jeffrey Nichols
Texas Department of Public Safety – Texas Highway Patrol, TX
EOW: Saturday, March 26, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Virginia State Police, Virginia
Trooper Chad Phillip Dermyer
Virginia State Police, VA
EOW: Thursday, March 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Columbus Division of Police, Ohio
Police Officer Steven Michael Smith
Columbus Division of Police, OH
EOW: Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government
Border Patrol Agent Jose Daniel Barraza
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, US
EOW: Monday, April 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Florida Department of Corrections, Florida
Sergeant Jorge Ramos
Florida Department of Corrections, FL
EOW: Sunday, May 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
Bibb County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia
Investigator Anthony “TJ” Freeman
Bibb County Sheriff’s Office, GA
EOW: Thursday, May 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicle pursuit
 
Kansas City Police Department, Kansas
Detective Brad D. Lancaster
Kansas City Police Department, KS
EOW: Monday, May 9, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Phoenix Police Department, Arizona
Police Officer David Van Glasser
Phoenix Police Department, AZ
EOW: Thursday, May 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Hilliard Division of Police, Ohio
Police Officer Sean Richard Johnson
Hilliard Division of Police, OH
EOW: Thursday, May 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
Auburn Police Department, Massachusetts
Police Officer Ronald Tarentino, Jr.
Auburn Police Department, MA
EOW: Sunday, May 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Branch County Sheriff’s Office, Michigan
Deputy Sheriff Michael Arthur Winter
Branch County Sheriff’s Office, MI
EOW: Tuesday, May 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Animal related
 
Winnsboro Police Department, Louisiana
Sergeant Derrick Mingo
Winnsboro Police Department, LA
EOW: Saturday, June 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Memphis Police Department, Tennessee
Police Officer Verdell Smith, Sr
Memphis Police Department, TN
EOW: Saturday, June 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
New Orleans Police Department, Louisiana
Police Officer Natasha Maria Hunter
New Orleans Police Department, LA
EOW: Tuesday, June 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations, U.S. Government
Deportation Officer Brian Beliso
United States Department of Homeland Security – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations, US
EOW: Wednesday, June 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
Pearland Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Endy Nddiobong Ekpanya
Pearland Police Department, TX
EOW: Sunday, June 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
San Jose Police Department, California
Police Officer Michael Jason Katherman
San Jose Police Department, CA
EOW: Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
Gainesboro Police Department, Tennessee
Police Officer Zachary Tyler Larnerd
Gainesboro Police Department, TN
EOW: Wednesday, June 15, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Patton Village Police Department, Texas
Sergeant Stacey Allen Baumgartner
Patton Village Police Department, TX
EOW: Sunday, June 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicle pursuit
 
Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office, Louisiana
Deputy Sheriff David Francis Michel, Jr.
Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office, LA
EOW: Wednesday, June 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Humphreys County Sheriff’s Office, Tennessee
Deputy Sheriff Martin Tase Sturgill, II
Humphreys County Sheriff’s Office, TN
EOW: Thursday, June 30, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
Sterlington Police Department, Louisiana
Sergeant David Kyle Elahi
Sterlington Police Department, LA
EOW: Sunday, July 3, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
St. Francois County Sheriff’s Office, Missouri
Deputy Sheriff Paul Clark
St. Francois County Sheriff’s Office, MO
EOW: Monday, July 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Southern Methodist University Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Calvin “Mark” McCullers
Southern Methodist University Police Department, TX
EOW: Tuesday, July 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Drowned
 
Dallas Police Department, Texas
Senior Corporal Lorne Bradley Ahrens
Dallas Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Dallas Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Michael Leslie Krol
Dallas Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Dallas Police Department, Texas
Sergeant Michael Joseph Smith
Dallas Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Dallas Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Patricio E. Zamarripa
Dallas Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Brent Alan Thompson
Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Town of Salem Department of Public Safety, Wisconsin
Public Safety Officer Michael Joshua Ventura
Town of Salem Department of Public Safety, WI
EOW: Friday, July 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Berrien County Sheriff’s Department, Michigan
Security Supervisor Joseph P. Zangaro
Berrien County Sheriff’s Department, MI
EOW: Monday, July 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Berrien County Sheriff’s Department, Michigan
Court Officer Ronald Eugene Kienzle
Berrien County Sheriff’s Department, MI
EOW: Monday, July 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Bellaire Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Marco Antonio Zarate
Bellaire Police Department, TX
EOW: Tuesday, July 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicle pursuit
 
Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Texas
Corrections Officer Mari Johnson
Texas Department of Criminal Justice, TX
EOW: Saturday, July 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Assault
 
Baton Rouge Police Department, Louisiana
Corporal Montrell Lyle Jackson
Baton Rouge Police Department, LA
EOW: Sunday, July 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office, Louisiana
Deputy Sheriff Bradford Allen Garafola
East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Office, LA
EOW: Sunday, July 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Baton Rouge Police Department, Louisiana
Police Officer Matthew Lane Gerald
Baton Rouge Police Department, LA
EOW: Sunday, July 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Luzerne County Correctional Facility, Pennsylvania
Correctional Officer Kristopher D. Moules
Luzerne County Correctional Facility, PA
EOW: Monday, July 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Assault
 
Kansas City Police Department, Kansas
Captain Robert David Melton
Kansas City Police Department, KS
EOW: Tuesday, July 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
San Diego Police Department, California
Police Officer Jonathan M. DeGuzman
San Diego Police Department, CA
EOW: Thursday, July 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
West Des Moines Police Department, Iowa
Sergeant Shawn Miller
West Des Moines Police Department, IA
EOW: Wednesday, August 3, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Amarillo Police Department, Texas
Police Officer Justin Scherlen
Amarillo Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, August 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Tennessee
Special Agent De’Greaun Frazier
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, TN
EOW: Tuesday, August 9, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Sebastian County Sheriff’s Office, Arkansas
Corporal Bill Cooper
Sebastian County Sheriff’s Office, AR
EOW: Wednesday, August 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government
Border Patrol Agent Manuel Alvarez
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, US
EOW: Thursday, August 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
Hatch Police Department, New Mexico
Police Officer Jose Ismael Chavez
Hatch Police Department, NM
EOW: Friday, August 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Eastman Police Department, Georgia
Police Officer Timothy Kevin Smith
Eastman Police Department, GA
EOW: Saturday, August 13, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Fenton Police Department, Louisiana
Police Officer Shannon Brown
Fenton Police Department, LA
EOW: Saturday, August 13, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Maryville Police Department, Tennessee
Police Officer Kenneth Ray Moats
Maryville Police Department, TN
EOW: Thursday, August 25, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Navajo Division of Public Safety, Tribal Police
Senior Police Officer Leander Frank
Navajo Division of Public Safety, TR
EOW: Tuesday, August 30, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Alamogordo Police Department, New Mexico
Police Officer Clint Corvinus
Alamogordo Police Department, NM
EOW: Friday, September 2, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Austin Police Department, Texas
Senior Police Officer Amir Abdul-Khaliq
Austin Police Department, TX
EOW: Sunday, September 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico
Lieutenant Waldemar Rivera-Santiago
Puerto Rico Police Department, PR
EOW: Monday, September 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
Eastland County Sheriff’s Office, Texas
Deputy Sheriff Kenneth Hubert Maltby
Eastland County Sheriff’s Office, TX
EOW: Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Johnson County Sheriff’s Office, Kansas
Master Deputy Sheriff Brandon Collins
Johnson County Sheriff’s Office, KS
EOW: Sunday, September 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Shelby Police Department, North Carolina
K9 Officer Timothy James Brackeen
Shelby Police Department, NC
EOW: Monday, September 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
McCrory Police Department, Arkansas
Police Officer Robert Aaron Barker
McCrory Police Department, AR
EOW: Thursday, September 15, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Cook County Sheriff’s Police Department, Illinois
Patrol Officer Jason Gallero
Cook County Sheriff’s Police Department, IL
EOW: Thursday, September 15, 2016
Cause of Death: Duty related illness
 
Ohio State Highway Patrol, Ohio
Trooper Kenneth V. Velez
Ohio State Highway Patrol, OH
EOW: Thursday, September 15, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Alabama Department of Corrections, Alabama
Correctional Officer Kenneth Bettis
Alabama Department of Corrections, AL
EOW: Friday, September 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Stabbed
 
Detroit Police Department, Michigan
Sergeant Kenneth Steil
Detroit Police Department, MI
EOW: Saturday, September 17, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Ulster County Sheriff’s Office, New York
Sergeant Kerry Winters
Ulster County Sheriff’s Office, NY
EOW: Thursday, September 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Drowned
 
Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico
Agent Edwin Pabón-Robles
Puerto Rico Police Department, PR
EOW: Friday, September 23, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Pennsylvania
Corrections Officer David M. Weaver
Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, PA
EOW: Monday, September 26, 2016
Cause of Death: Fall
 
Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office, North Carolina
Deputy Sheriff John Thomas Isenhour
Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office, NC
EOW: Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Gregg County Sheriff’s Office, Texas
Corporal Robert Eugene Ransom
Gregg County Sheriff’s Office, TX
EOW: Friday, September 30, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, California
Sergeant Steve Owen
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, CA
EOW: Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
New York State Police, New York
Investigator Paul R. Stuewer
New York State Police, NY
EOW: Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Cause of Death: 9/11 related illness
 
Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico
Agent Victor Rosado-Rosa
Puerto Rico Police Department, PR
EOW: Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Cause of Death: Motorcycle accident
 
St. Louis County Police Department, Missouri
Police Officer Blake Curtis Snyder
St. Louis County Police Department, MO
EOW: Thursday, October 6, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Palm Springs Police Department, California
Police Officer Lesley Zerebny
Palm Springs Police Department, CA
EOW: Saturday, October 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Palm Springs Police Department, California
Police Officer Jose Gilbert Vega
Palm Springs Police Department, CA
EOW: Saturday, October 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Puerto Rico Police Department, Puerto Rico
Sergeant Luis A. Meléndez-Maldonado
Puerto Rico Police Department, PR
EOW: Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Chesapeake Police Department, Ohio
Police Officer Aaron J. Christian
Chesapeake Police Department, OH
EOW: Tuesday, October 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Modoc County Sheriff’s Office, California
Deputy Sheriff Jack Hopkins
Modoc County Sheriff’s Office, CA
EOW: Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, California
Sergeant Alfonso Lopez
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, CA
EOW: Monday, October 24, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
New York State Police, New York
Trooper Timothy P. Pratt
New York State Police, NY
EOW: Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Fairbanks Police Department, Alaska
Sergeant Allen Brandt
Fairbanks Police Department, AK
EOW: Friday, October 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Chester Police Department, Illinois
Police Officer James Brockmeyer
Chester Police Department, IL
EOW: Friday, October 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicle pursuit
 
Detroit Police Department, Michigan
Police Officer Myron Jarrett
Detroit Police Department, MI
EOW: Friday, October 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Rusk County Sheriff’s Office, Wisconsin
Deputy Sheriff Dan Glaze
Rusk County Sheriff’s Office, WI
EOW: Saturday, October 29, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Fresno County Sheriff’s Office, California
Sergeant Rod Lucas
Fresno County Sheriff’s Office, CA
EOW: Monday, October 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire (Accidental)
 
Taylor County Sheriff’s Office, Florida
Deputy Sheriff Scott Williams
Taylor County Sheriff’s Office, FL
EOW: Monday, October 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Miami Police Department, Florida
Police Officer Jorge Sanchez
Miami Police Department, FL
EOW: Tuesday, November 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Urbandale Police Department, Iowa
Police Officer Justin Scott Martin
Urbandale Police Department, IA
EOW: Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Des Moines Police Department, Iowa
Sergeant Anthony David Beminio
Des Moines Police Department, IA
EOW: Wednesday, November 2, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
New York City Police Department, New York
Sergeant Paul Tuozzolo
New York City Police Department, NY
EOW: Friday, November 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Peach County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia
Sergeant Patrick Michael Sondron
Peach County Sheriff’s Office, GA
EOW: Sunday, November 6, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
West Valley City Police Department, Utah
Police Officer Cody Brotherson
West Valley City Police Department, UT
EOW: Sunday, November 6, 2016
Cause of Death: Vehicular assault
 
Show Low Police Department, Arizona
Police Officer Darrin Reed
Show Low Police Department, AZ
EOW: Tuesday, November 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Peach County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia
Deputy Sheriff Daryl Smallwood
Peach County Sheriff’s Office, GA
EOW: Tuesday, November 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
New Orleans Police Department, Louisiana
Police Officer Jude Williams Lewis
New Orleans Police Department, LA
EOW: Tuesday, November 8, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Canonsburg Borough Police Department, Pennsylvania
Police Officer Scott Leslie Bashioum
Canonsburg Borough Police Department, PA
EOW: Thursday, November 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department, California
Deputy Sheriff Dennis Wallace
Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department, CA
EOW: Sunday, November 13, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Newton County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia
Deputy Sheriff Justin White
Newton County Sheriff’s Office, GA
EOW: Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government
Border Patrol Agent David Gomez
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, US
EOW: Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Heart attack
 
South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force, Texas
Assistant Commander Kenneth Joseph Starrs
South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force, TX
EOW: Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by train
 
United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service, U.S. Government
Deputy Commander Patrick Thomas Carothers
United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service, US
EOW: Friday, November 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
San Antonio Police Department, Texas
Detective Benjamin Edward Marconi
San Antonio Police Department, TX
EOW: Sunday, November 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Nassau County Sheriff’s Office, Florida
Deputy Sheriff Eric James Oliver
Nassau County Sheriff’s Office, FL
EOW: Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Utah Highway Patrol, Utah
Trooper Eric Dale Ellsworth
Utah Highway Patrol, UT
EOW: Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Wayne State University Police Department, Michigan
Police Officer Collin James Rose
Wayne State University Police Department, MI
EOW: Wednesday, November 23, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Colorado State Patrol, Colorado
Trooper Cody James Donahue
Colorado State Patrol, CO
EOW: Friday, November 25, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, California
K9 Jojo
San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, CA
EOW: Wednesday, January 6, 2016
Cause of Death: Asphyxiation
 
Canton Police Department, Ohio
K9 Jethro
Canton Police Department, OH
EOW: Sunday, January 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Norfolk Police Department, Virginia
K9 Krijger
Norfolk Police Department, VA
EOW: Monday, January 11, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Smith County Constable’s Office – Precinct 5, Texas
K9 Ogar
Smith County Constable’s Office – Precinct 5, TX
EOW: Tuesday, January 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Twin Rivers Unified School District Police Department, California
K9 Jag
Twin Rivers Unified School District Police Department, CA
EOW: Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Omaha Police Department, Nebraska
K9 Kobus
Omaha Police Department, NE
EOW: Saturday, January 23, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Rutland County Sheriff’s Office, Vermont
K9 Betcha
Rutland County Sheriff’s Office, VT
EOW: Friday, January 29, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Port Authority of Allegheny County Police Department, Pennsylvania
K9 Aren
Port Authority of Allegheny County Police Department, PA
EOW: Sunday, January 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Stabbed
 
Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, Tennessee
K9 Vigor
Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, TN
EOW: Wednesday, March 9, 2016
Cause of Death: Drowned
 
Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, Washington
K9 Reefer
Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, WA
EOW: Wednesday, March 9, 2016
Cause of Death: Struck by vehicle
 
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Nevada
K9 Nicky
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, NV
EOW: Thursday, March 31, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire (Accidental)
 
Unified Police Department of Greater Salt Lake, Utah
K9 Aldo
Unified Police Department of Greater Salt Lake, UT
EOW: Wednesday, April 27, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Anaheim Police Department, California
K9 Bruno
Anaheim Police Department, CA
EOW: Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Westchester County Department of Public Safety, New York
K9 Suki
Westchester County Department of Public Safety, NY
EOW: Friday, May 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
La Salle County Sheriff’s Office, Texas
K9 Ledger
La Salle County Sheriff’s Office, TX
EOW: Sunday, May 29, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Richland Parish Sheriff’s Office, Louisiana
K9 Duke
Richland Parish Sheriff’s Office, LA
EOW: Wednesday, June 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
San Juan Police Department, Texas
K9 Rex
San Juan Police Department, TX
EOW: Thursday, June 2, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Cherokee County School District Police Department, Georgia
K9 Inca
Cherokee County School District Police Department, GA
EOW: Friday, June 10, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Amarillo Police Department, Texas
K9 Bruno
Amarillo Police Department, TX
EOW: Sunday, June 12, 2016
Cause of Death: Accidental
 
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, U.S. Government
K9 Lazer
United States Department of Homeland Security – Customs and Border Protection – United States Border Patrol, US
EOW: Monday, June 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Fountain County Sheriff’s Office, Indiana
K9 Tyson
Fountain County Sheriff’s Office, IN
EOW: Monday, June 27, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Long Beach Police Department, California
K9 Credo
Long Beach Police Department, CA
EOW: Tuesday, June 28, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire (Accidental)
 
Emmett Police Department, Idaho
K9 Roscoe
Emmett Police Department, ID
EOW: Friday, July 1, 2016
Cause of Death: Automobile accident
 
Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Pennsylvania
K9 Totti
Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, PA
EOW: Thursday, July 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Arlington Police Department, Texas
K9 Mojo
Arlington Police Department, TX
EOW: Tuesday, July 19, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Stephens County Sheriff’s Office, Oklahoma
K9 Bak
Stephens County Sheriff’s Office, OK
EOW: Thursday, August 4, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
Kingman Police Department, Arizona
K9 Amigo
Kingman Police Department, AZ
EOW: Saturday, August 20, 2016
Cause of Death: Heat exhaustion
 
California City Police Department, California
K9 Ty Vom Friedrichsfelder Eck
California City Police Department, CA
EOW: Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Cause of Death: Assault
 
Alaska State Troopers, Alaska
K9 Helo
Alaska State Troopers, AK
EOW: Sunday, September 25, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
Boise Police Department, Idaho
K9 Jardo
Boise Police Department, ID
EOW: Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
K9 Thor
Wethersfield Police Department, CT
EOW: Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Assault
 
Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, Florida
K9 Forest
Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, FL
EOW: Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire
 
K9 Payne
Pembroke Police Department, NC
EOW: Tuesday, November 29, 2016
Cause of Death: Gunfire

adminToo Many LEO Deaths
read more

Thank you, Officer

No comments

Saying Thanks

by Jonathan Farris

I’m an advocate. I work to reduce bystander and officer injuries and deaths caused during pursuits. As a result I typically focus on pursuits gone wrong or those I consider to be dangerous or unnecessary.

However, please do not think that I harbor ill will to the law enforcement community. I do not. In fact, it’s just the opposite of that.

Over the past several years I’ve had a chance to work with a number of amazing law enforcement professionals. These folks  are dedicated to saving law enforcement officer (LEO) lives, which in turn will save innocent bystander lives.

Weapons-related incidents and shootings are most often picked up by the media, but in a typical year more officers are injured or killed while in their squad cars. That often happens due to lack of seatbelt usage, driving faster than is reasonably safe, police pursuits of all types, and more.

Even though there are still too many unnecessary pursuits in which innocent bystanders or LEOs are hurt or killed, this represents a minuscule percentage of total miles driven by officers annually.

So let me simply say “THANKS” to law enforcement professionals across the globe. I could not do your jobs; but know I am personally grateful that you can and do.

 

adminThank you, Officer
read more

Police chase deaths up in 2014

No comments

by Tom Frank, USA Today. 12/28/2015
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/12/23/police-chase-deaths-up-in-2014/77762174/

Police chase deaths up in 2014

DEATHS * 385
Bystanders 73
Passengers 77
Total Bystanders 150
Bystander under age 12 12
Police Officers 5
INJURIES * 1764

 

The number of people killed in high-speed police chases surged in 2014 to its highest level since 2007 despite efforts by police departments to reduce the risks of people getting killed and injured, a USA TODAY analysis shows.

A total of 385 people died in motor-vehicle crashes in 2014 that occurred while police were chasing a vehicle, up 16% from the 333 people killed in 2013, the USA TODAY review of federal records shows.

“A huge percentage of these deaths are unnecessary,” said Jonathan Farris, former chairman of PursuitSAFETY, which advocates to restrict police chases and improve reporting of chase-related deaths and injuries. Farris’ son Paul, 23, was killed in 2007 near Boston by a motorist being chased for a traffic violation.

Approximately 73 of the people killed in 2014 were bystanders — mostly people in their own cars that were hit by a fleeing motorist — and 77 were passengers in the fleeing vehicles. Twelve of those killed were children age 14 or younger, including an infant who had not yet turned one. Five were police officers.

Thousands more people were injured in the chases, which usually begin for minor infractions such as traffic violations. Although the federal government does not count injuries in police chases, five states that do keep track reported that a combined total of 1,764 people were injured in 2014 in their states.

Those states — California, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — make up nearly 23% of the U.S. population, which suggests that more than 7,700 people may have been injured nationwide in police chases in 2014.

Records from those states also suggest that there were about 52,000 police chases in 2014.

 

adminPolice chase deaths up in 2014
read more

Dallas Tragedy: 2 Snipers Ambush, Kill 5 Officers, Injure 7 Following Peaceful Protest

No comments

Our hearts and prayers go out to everyone affected by this heinous and hateful crime.

Five officers are dead — four Dallas police officers and one Dallas Area Rapid Transit officer — after police say two snipers ambushed and opened fire on police officers at the end of a peaceful protest against nationwide officer-involved shootings Thursday night.These officers have given everything to serve the citizens of Dallas, and our thoughts and prayers are with their families.Ron Pinkston, President, Dallas Police Association

Seven officers and two civilians were also injured in the shootings. All are expected to recover.

“This is a terrible blow to the city of Dallas. This is a terrible blow to the United States of America,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said on the NBC’s “Today” show Friday morning.

Dallas Police Chief David Brown said Friday officers cornered a suspect — later identified as Micah X. Johnson, of Mesquite — and tried to negotiate with him for several hours before talks broke down. Johnson told police he was upset by recent police shootings and “wanted to kill white people.”

After an exchange of gunfire, officers attached explosives to a bomb robot and detonated them near Johnson, killing him.

First Seconds: Protest Erupts into GunfireFirst Seconds: Protest Erupts into GunfireA protest against nationwide officer-involved shootings turns violent in Dallas’s downtown area. In the end, five police officers were killed by two men who were in sniping positions above ground, according to authorities. Another 6 officers were injured. (Published 4 hours ago)

Brown said other options to bring the standoff to an end would have exposed more officers to grave danger.

Brown said before the standoff ended, Johnson told a hostage negotiator he was upset about recent shootings involving police officers and that he specifically wanted to kill white police officers. He added that he was not affiliated with any group, carried out the act alone and said police would eventually find the IEDs he claimed to have placed around the city.

Raw Video: Witness Accounts of DPD Officers ShotRaw Video: Witness Accounts of DPD Officers ShotWitnesses tell NBC 5 what they saw after Dallas police officers were shot after a rally in Downtown Dallas Thursday night. (Published 4 hours ago)

Rawlings said police have swept the area where the standoff took place and investigated one suspicious package but found no explosives. Maj. Max Geron, with the Dallas Police Department, said on Twitter the area was cleared and crime scene investigators began processing the massive crime scene at about 6 a.m.

Police said earlier in the evening three other suspects were in custody in connection with the shooting, though Brown and Rawlings said Friday morning they were still investigating and didn’t want to compromise the ongoing investigation by elaborating on who was in custody.

Dallas Police Chief, Mayor 12:30 A.M. Update (Raw Video)Dallas Police Chief, Mayor 12:30 A.M. Update (Raw Video)Dallas Police Chief David Brown and Mayor Mike Rawlings provide a 12:30 a.m. update on the shootings in downtown Dallas. During this second press conference, Rawlings confirmed that he heard from the White House and the Governor’s office. (Published 45 minutes ago)

“I’m not going to be satisfied until we turn over every stone,” Brown said. “If there’s someone out there associated with this, we will find you.”

Rawlings called the shooting Dallas’ “worst nightmare” and asked that all residents “come together and support our police officers.” Brown reiterated that message Friday, asking for prayers and support from the community in the wake of the shootings.

Officers Take Cover After Shots Fired DowntownOfficers Take Cover After Shots Fired DowntownDallas police officers take cover after shots were fired during a protest of nationwide officer-involved shootings, July 8, 2016. (Published Thursday, July 7, 2016)

“We’re hurting. Our profession is hurting. Dallas officers are hurting. We are heartbroken. There are no words to describe the atrocity that occurred to our city. All I know is that this must stop. This divisiveness between our police and our citizens,” Brown said. “We don’t feel much support most days. Let’s not make today most days. We need your support to be able to protect your from men like these.”

Scores of Dallas and DART police officers arrived downtown following the shooting, which took place along Main Street between and Market and Lamar streets, a block from the Old Red Courthouse building just before 9 p.m.

Map Credit: The Dallas Morning News
“I saw all the cops were bending over. There had to have been five or six cops, and they were all getting shot down. It was right after the rally, we were walking to the car,” said Cortney Washington, of Dallas. “They kept shooting. It was coming — we didn’t know where it was coming from. And I didn’t see anybody else get shot. It was just the cops. I didn’t see nobody else get shot.”

Twelve officers in all — eight Dallas police and four DART — were shot by gunmen in what police believe to be a coordinated ambush attack that began at 8:58 p.m., at the close of a rally in solidarity with two men killed in officer-involved shootings, one in Louisiana, one in Minnesota.

Dramatic Photos: Deadly Sniper Attack in Downtown DallasDramatic Photos: Deadly Sniper Attack in Downtown Dallas

Video from the scene showed officers taking cover and people in the rally scattering after gunshots were heard.

One of the injured civilians was identified by family as Shetamia Taylor, who was shot while shielding her children from the gunfire, her sister told NBC 5. Taylor’s condition is not known. A male victim was also injured in the shootings, according to City of Dallas spokeswoman Sana Syed. His identity and condition have not yet been released.

2 Dallas Officers Die After Transport to Baylor UMC2 Dallas Officers Die After Transport to Baylor UMCTwo of five Dallas police officers killed in shootings at a protest Thursday died after being transported Baylor University Medical Center. (Published 3 hours ago)

One person was taken into custody at about 11:30 p.m., Dallas police said, following an exchange of gunfire with Dallas SWAT officers. A suspicious package was located near that person, and the package was being investigated by bomb squad personnel. Two other people were taken into custody in connection with a vehicle, Brown said.

Thursday’s protest was organized by Dominique R. Alexander, an ordained minister and the head of the Next Generation Action Network, according to The New York Times. He told the Times the organization “does not condone violence against any human being, and we condemn anyone who wants to commit violence.” Next Generation plans to hold a news conference at 11 a.m. Friday to discuss the ambush.

Shooting Occurred After Dallas Rally, MarchShooting Occurred After Dallas Rally, MarchNBC 5’s Cory Smith, who was in downtown Dallas covering the rally, describes the scene during and after the shooting Thursday night. (Published Friday, July 8, 2016)

Brown said it was too early to say whether there was a connection between the attackers and the demonstration.

“I was right there when the shooting happened,” Alexander added. “They could have shot me.”

Officers Salute Fallen PeersOfficers Salute Fallen PeersPolice officers salute their fallen peers outside Parkland Memorial Hospital, where several officers were transported after shootings at a protest in Dallas. (Published 3 hours ago)

Another rally organizer Cory Hughes told NBC 5 the protest was peaceful and as the crowd was dispersing, they heard gunfire. He said the scene turned into “mayhem; we didn’t know where to go.” He added he knew it was a serious situation when he saw officers coming from all directions, carrying rifles and tactical gear.

“They were shots ringing out from what felt like every direction,” Hughes said.

The deceased DART officer was identified as 43-year-old Officer Brent Thompson. He is the first DART officer killed in the line of duty since the transit service formed a police department in 1989. He joined DART in 2009, according to a department statement. Identities of the deceased Dallas police officers have not been released.

President Barack Obama, who was in Warsaw, Poland, for a NATO meeting, condemned the “vicious, callous and despicable attack.”

“I believe I speak for every single American when I say that we are horrified over these events and that we stand united with the people and the police department in Dallas,” the president said.

Gov. Greg Abbott offered the state’s assistance to Dallas overnight and Obama pledged federal support.

Dallas County buildings, including the George L. Allen Sr. Courts building, are closed Friday, among several closures due to the ongoing police investigation. El Centro College is closed Friday, and classes are canceled due to the police investigation.

The ATF and FBI have joined the investigation, authorities said.

Dallas police released a photo of a man whom they considered a “person of interest” in the shootings. The man, whose identity has not been released, surrendered to police for questioning and was later released.

A witness who posted video to Facebook said he saw at least three officers wounded near El Centro College. (Video is embedded below.)

It is the deadliest day for United States law enforcement agents since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks killed 72, NBC News reported. The shooting comes just over a year after a man opened fire on Dallas Police Headquarters on South Lamar Street. No officers were injured in the ensuing shootout.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE, PHOTOS AND VIDEOS HERE: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Protests-in-Dallas-Over-Alton-Sterling-Death-385784431.html

adminDallas Tragedy: 2 Snipers Ambush, Kill 5 Officers, Injure 7 Following Peaceful Protest
read more

NBC 5 Chicago Investigates – Part 2

No comments

To Curb Deaths, Some Police Make the Choice Not to Chase

Ingrained in every law enforcement officer are a few basic tenets: serve and protect, and catch evildoers before they can do more harm. It’s what they are paid to do, often risking their lives to accomplish those two goals.

But some departments are taking the drastic step of telling their officers to actually let the bad guy get away. That’s because in many circumstances, chasing them is simply too dangerous.

“The threat to innocent life does not justify chasing the vast majority of cars that decide not to stop for police,” says Edward Flynn, Chief of Police in Milwaukee. Six years ago, after a series of high profile crashes relating to chases, Flynn decided enough was enough, and implemented a new policy. Starting in March of 2010, officers were ordered to commence pursuits only for violent offenses.

No traffic violations. No stolen cars.

“In a three month period in 2010, we had four innocent people killed in three accidents,” Flynn said. “In every one of these tragedies the officers had realized the recklessness of the person they were chasing didn’t justify continued pursuit. One was for a stolen license plate!”

But once that pursuit begins, he noted, there is no controlling the missile which is often launched through populated neighborhoods, or streets, in the form of a fleeing car. And even if police break off the pursuit, they can’t control what the fleeing driver does next.

“I mean, I’ve buried officers who were killed in pursuits, alright?” he noted. “If you’re going to risk your life, and run the risk of that person is going to kill an innocent person, then the standard….has got to be a standard that says we’re involved in a crime of violence here. Not simply a property crime or a traffic offense, or some other low level offense.”

The new policy appears to have made a difference in Milwaukee. From 103 pursuit related crashes in 2007, to just 39 last year.

In May, NBC5 Investigates reported the alarming number of fatalities from police pursuits in the Chicagoland area: 141 pursuit-related crashes in the last ten years, resulting in 108 fatalities, and another 216 injured.

But the cases are not always easily defined.

In 2014, 20 year old Freddie Morales was walking to his car, when he was struck and killed by a Wheeling squad car, running with no lights or siren, clocked at up to 109 miles per hour. The officer who hit Morales, argued he was attempting to catch up with a speeder, and had not turned on his lights to avoid triggering a scenario where that driver might flee.

Morales, a pedestrian, was determined to have a blood alcohol level of between .158 and .228. He was killed instantly, and recently, the Village of Wheeling paid out a settlement to his family, of $853,000.

Ironically, under new chief James Dunne, Wheeling’s policy is now remarkably similar to Milwaukee’s. Dunne maintains the officer in the Morales case, who he called an “exemplary” member of his department, was truly only trying to catch up with a speeder, and was not engaged in a real chase. But like Flynn, he said he is concerned about the inherent dangers of police pursuits.

“Our policy is we won’t pursue for property crimes, or traffic,” he said. “It has to be a forcible felony.”

The true metric of any such policy, or course, is a reduction in injuries or deaths. In Milwaukee, two innocent bystanders have been killed since Flynn implemented his stricter policy. Chicago allows chases more often, and here we’ve seen 12 bystanders killed during the same period.

“As an industry, we need to re-evaluate how often we engage in this behavior,” he said. “And if the apprehension, is worth death!”

Published at 11:01 PM CDT on Jul 5, 2016

Original article at http://www.nbcchicago.com/investigations/To-Curb-Deaths-Some-Police-Make-the-Choice-Not-to-Chase-385643481.html

adminNBC 5 Chicago Investigates – Part 2
read more

Advocates working to change police pursuit policies (WSMV)

No comments

Advocates working to change police pursuit policies

Posted: Jun 30, 2016 9:29 PM CDT
Reported by Heather Hourigan

Original article at: http://www.wsmv.com/clip/12564582/advocates-working-to-change-police-pursuit-policies

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) –Thousands of bystanders and passengers have been killed since the 1980s in high-speed police chases.

One of those happened last week in Murfreesboro when a mother of two was killed instantly when the suspect rammed into her car.

Now her family is wanting to know why her life was taken for a stolen car.

The International Association of Chiefs of Police conducted a survey on thousands of chases nationally. They found 92 percent of pursuits began for a traffic violation, misdemeanor or non-violent felonies.

“I got involved in this in 2007 when my son was killed. I was boggled. I just couldn’t believe the number of them,” said Jonathan Farris, the founder of Pursuit for Change.

It often takes tragedy to bring to light the dangers of high-speed police chases.

“This should have never happened. This right here should have never happened,” said Mildred Parker, Jessica Campos’ mother.

Campos was killed in Murfreesboro when a suspect hit her after a more than 30-mile chase over a stolen car.

“It’s that cross jurisdictional issue,  but someone gave me the number and it’s close to 19,000 law enforcement agencies, and they all have different policies,” Farris said.

Farris lost his son, Paul, in a city that has essentially a no pursuit policy, but the pursuit began in another county.

“My son and his girlfriend were in the backseat of a taxi. That taxi came to the intersection and the perpetrator was in an SUV and just t-boned them. Literally lifted the taxi up and threw it onto a sidewalk,” Farris said.

The chase started over an illegal U-turn.

“That’s when I lost it and decided I need to figure out why this is happening, how it’s happening, and so that’s when I started tracking pursuits,” Farris said.

He found that they are happening too often and for non-violent crimes.

Farris is working for federal regulations making pursuit policies consistent and for violent felonies only.

“No one has done anything with high-speed pursuits for the last 20 years,” said Trevor Fischbach, president of StarChase.

Fischbach is working to develop technology so police don’t have to chase at all.

“It’s mounted to the patrol car,” he said.

It may look like an Inspector Gadget car, but StarChase allows police officers to launch a GPS device onto a suspect’s car.

Statistic show it works, allowing police to track the suspects without having to use high speeds and putting others’ lives at risk. However, it does come with a price tag.

“Today we hear these stories and some are obviously much more tragic than others and this is definitely a tragic one. That is why we are working so hard to provide this technology to agencies,” Fischbach said.

Right now about 100 police agencies are using StarChase, none in Tennessee.

To get involved with Pursuit for Change, click here to visit their website. There is also a petition to help get new legislation enacted.

Copyright 2016 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

adminAdvocates working to change police pursuit policies (WSMV)
read more

Our View: City, county should have common police chase policy

No comments

Thanks to the Rockford Register for this editorial. They make very good recommendations regarding more commonality of different departments’ pursuit policies. If lives are truly to be saved, then move to a policy allowing pursuits for only violent felonies. And support local law enforcement with additional driving training and the ability to try new pursuit reduction technologies.
Jon Farris – Chief Advocate, Pursuit For Change


Photo credit: Illinois State Police work the scene of a fatal accident Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, on South Springfield Avenue at Cunningham Road in Rockford.  RRSTAR.COM FILE PHOTO


Original post: http://www.rrstar.com/opinion/20160612/our-view-city-county-should-have-common-police-chase-policy

We’ve been critical of the Rockford Police Department’s “no chase” policy in the past. That’s why we are pleased that new Rockford Police Chief Dan O’Shea has changed the department’s policy to one that’s reasonable and gives officers the authority to decide when and when not to chase, based on several criteria.

In a meeting with the Editorial Board last week, O’Shea said Rockford police will chase violent offenders who are considered an imminent threat to others, based on traffic conditions, the time of day and the presence of pedestrians. If an officer is shot, the police definitely will chase if at all possible.

Meanwhile, the Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department continues its “pedal to the metal” policy. Last week, a sheriff’s deputy went on a high-speed chase, at one point reaching 100 mph, to pursue someone because he wasn’t wearing a seat belt and the deputy thought he saw the driver of the Chevy Tahoe reaching down under the seat to maybe hide something. This was at 10:24 p.m., in the darkness of night.

The deputy tried to pursue the car, but it sped away. The chase led from southeast Rockford to Illinois 251 to Perryville Road, where the Tahoe was traveling in the wrong lane. The deputy stopped chasing at that point.

This is the latest in a series of high-speed chases by the Sheriff’s Department, one of which ended in the death of Joy Lambert, 55, who was on her way to work at BMO Harris Bank. The deputy didn’t hit her, but the car he was chasing at a high speed on Springfield Avenue did.

Another sheriff’s chase ended up with the chased car wrecked on the sidewalk directly in front of Rockford City Hall.

None of those chases involved suspects who were immediate threats to public safety.

We’ve applauded Sheriff Gary Caruana for his efforts to beef up crime fighting throughout the county with an emphasis on high-crime areas. But we think the sheriff’s chase policy should be rethought, with greater emphasis put on the safety of innocent bystanders and the officers.

In fact, we urge the city and county to adopt a common policy and training regimen to ensure that everyone is on the same page and knows the same driving techniques. Throw in the Rockford Park District, Loves Park Police and rural village departments, too.

There is no question that police chases are inherently dangerous to the public.

A USA Today analysis published in 2015 found that “More than 5,000 bystanders and passengers have been killed in police car chases since 1979, and tens of thousands more were injured as officers repeatedly pursued drivers at high speeds and in hazardous conditions, often for minor infractions. … Police across the USA chase tens of thousands of people each year, often causing drivers to speed away recklessly.”

The International Association of Chiefs of Police, based in Alexandria, Virginia, has a model “vehicular pursuit policy,” updated in 2015, on its website, theiacp.org. We have read it, and it seems logical and reasonable to us civilians.

Here are the first three guidelines:

1. Pursuit is authorized only if the officer has a reasonable belief that the suspect, if allowed to flee, would present a danger to human life or cause serious injury. In general, pursuits for minor violations are discouraged.

2. The decision to initiate a pursuit must be based on the pursuing officer’s conclusion that the immediate danger to the officer and the public created by the pursuit is less than the immediate or potential danger to the public should the suspect remain at large.

3. Unless a greater hazard would result, a pursuit should not be undertaken if the subject(s) can be identified with enough certainty that they can be apprehended at a later time.

The entire policy is online in convenient PDF form. It reads plainly and is very similar to the guidelines O’Shea described.

We recommend all police agencies follow it, so they’re all on the same page when we’re all on the same roads.

adminOur View: City, county should have common police chase policy
read more

Police Pursuit, Maple Lake 5-Vehicle Crash Might Have Involved Medical Situation

No comments

http://kstp.com/news/maple-lake-5-vehicle-crash-police-pursuit/4164630/ 

Written by Dave Aeikens
Updated: 06/10/2016 9:37 AM

Photo credit: KSTP / Will Greiner

The investigation continues into a police pursuit and multi-vehicle crash that injured at least four people Tuesday near Maple Lake.

Authorities are trying to determine what happened and whether the driver was suffering from a medical incident or had criminal intent.

The Minnesota State Patrol said 73-year-old Barbara Belka of Rockville was seriously injured in the crash. She attracted the attention of police after a guard rail was damaged in South Haven. When Annandale Police and Wright County deputies tried to stop Belka, she continued. The pursuit was called off near Maple Lake and Belka’s car caused a crash with four other vehicles on Minnesota Highway 55 near Maple Lake, the state patrol said.

“We don’t know if this is a medical or criminal situation,” said Capt. Todd Hoffman of the Wright County Sheriff’s Office.

Belka has not been arrested, Hoffman said.

Hoffman would not say how fast the driver was going when law enforcement ended the pursuit. It’s about seven miles between South Haven and Maple Lake.

The patrol said Belka was taken to Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis.

Four other vehicles and at least three others were hurt, the patrol said.

The patrol said 55-year-old Steven Voight of St. Cloud, 20-year-old Mark Borer of Annandale and 39-year-old Wayne Paler of Annandale were taken to St. Cloud Hospital with injuries that are not life threatening.

The state patrol has not released the details of the crash.

adminPolice Pursuit, Maple Lake 5-Vehicle Crash Might Have Involved Medical Situation
read more

Toyota Prius Police Chase Advertising Update

No comments

On May 27, 2016 Jon Farris met with Toyota USA executives to discuss the Prius police chase advertising campaign. Although we’ll have more updates soon, here are two important points that came from the meeting:

  1. All Prius police chase ads will cease by June 20th
  2. The Toyota team has committed to not use police chases in any future ad campaigns

I want to thank these executives for a very respectful and productive meeting.

 

adminToyota Prius Police Chase Advertising Update
read more

Pursuit For Change and Toyota USA

1 comment

Persistence, people. If your mission is sound, then stay the course and fight the fight…

On May 27th, the 9th anniversary of Paul’s death, two Toyota USA senior management VPs are flying to Madison to meet with Jon Farris, Chief Advocate of Pursuit For Change.

They will discuss the Prius #PoliceChase advertising campaign and how Toyota can support the Pursuit For Change mission.

Never a dull moment in the quest to reduce unnecessary #PoliceChases and save lives of innocent bystanders and law enforcement officers.

An Open Letter To Toyota USA

adminPursuit For Change and Toyota USA
read more

Officer and K9 injured in wild Miami car chase

No comments

A suspect was taken into custody following a police pursuit in Miami Friday afternoon.

VIDEO: Officer, K-9 Hurt in Wild Miami Vehicle Pursuit

The chase, which started in downtown Miami, involved a red 4-door Nissan Altima that was seen speeding on Miami streets.

The car was eventually stopped in a driveway, and the driver, later identified as 34-year-old Keith Michel, was taken into custody, NBC Miami reports.

Footage showed officers surround the car with guns drawn as a K-9 approached. The car went in reverse and bumped a police car before it stopped and Michel got out.

One officer was injured and a K-9 was hurt, officials said. Officers from the City of Miami and Miami-Dade Police took part in the pursuit and arrest.

Police said Michel was wanted on serious felony charges in Lauderhill. Lauderhill Police said he was wanted for stabbing his girlfriend Thursday night. She’s in the hospital with multiple stab wounds.

UPDATE: Police dog injured ‘doing great,’ fugitive not so well

Source

adminOfficer and K9 injured in wild Miami car chase
read more

Hey Toyota. It’s Time To Remove The Prius Police Chase Ads

No comments

UPDATE:

We’re waiting for a more acceptable Toyota USA response to the highly disrespectful Prius #PoliceChase advertising. Jon Farris, Pursuit For Change Chief Advocate, is still attempting to arrange a meeting with the Marketing VP.

Our recent tweet and real-life Prius police chase points to this national problem. “Here’s an example of a dangerous in your Prius. Bad Marketing. Real Life”  

FULL STORY:

MONTPELIER — Thursday morning, police engaged in a vehicle pursuit of a 35-year-old Middlesex man who reportedly burglarized the Skinny Pancake.

At about 8:30 a.m., the Montpelier Police Department says it received a call that the Skinny Pancake, on Main Street, was burglarized. The caller, an employee, had interrupted the burglary in progress, according to a statement issued by police.

Police say the employee confronted a male suspect with a bandana covering his face, who was trying to steal a safe from the restaurant. The suspect then fled the scene in a silver 2006 Toyota Prius.

Police say the employee identified the suspect as Travis McGurran of Middlesex.

At 9:15 a.m., a Montpelier police detective located the suspect vehicle in Montpelier, according to the statement. McGurran then led police on a vehicle pursuit through the city and into Berlin. The chase ended on Rowell Hill Road in Berlin.

The pursuit lasted about 15 minutes said Montpelier Police Chief Anthony Facos. He said it was a high-speed chase at some points, and defined it in an interview Friday as dangerous.

McGurran was taken into custody at that location with the assistance of Berlin police.

Police say McGurran was found to be in possession of a substance believed to be heroin. There was also evidence of crack cocaine in the vehicle, according to the statement.

At Wednesday evening’s City Council meeting, Facos restated a point he has been making for more a year. Addiction, he said, fuels nearly all burglaries and robberies in the area.

“Part of the reason we need to get people off addiction, particularly heroin or opiate addiction is because it is directly related to the spikes in our burglaries,” he said. “I don’t like coming here every other week saying ‘Yup, all the burglaries and robberies are because of addiction.’”

Facos has been rethinking law enforcement’s approach of helping addicts get treatment. In March, Facos announced a new initiative for Montpelier Police called Project Safe Catch. The aim of the effort is for addicts to be able to ask police for help. If an addict comes into the station or approaches a police officer in the capital city requesting addiction treatment help, the police will act as a pathway to assist them.

Facos calls this root-cause problem solving.

“We came up with something based on a proven model in Massachusetts and Maine,” he said.

Facos said right now Montpelier PD and Barre PD are working to receive a three-year smart policing grant that would bring a task force and more police intelligence to the area. Addiction would be a focus if the grant is received.

“What that will do is also provide us a much bigger intelligence-led effort to make sure we are maximizing our resources, and part of that is also looking at any reductions of crime,” he said.

On Friday, Facos said Thursday’s burglary and chase were consistent with the drug and crime problem he has been seeing.

McGurran was arraigned in Washington County criminal court Thursday morning on the charges of burglary, attempting to elude and driving with a suspended license. He pleaded not guilty. McGurran was lodged at the Northeast Regional Correctional Facility for lack of $1,000 bail.

gina.tron @timesargus.com

adminHey Toyota. It’s Time To Remove The Prius Police Chase Ads
read more

Chase ends when suspects hit school bus in Dallas

No comments

DALLAS — A police pursuit ended Thursday afternoon when the suspects’ vehicle crashed into a school bus in northeast Dallas.

The chase began at a Fairfield Inn and Suites on the 4000 block of Towne Crossing Boulevard in Mesquite around 2:15 p.m., police said. A Mesquite police spokesperson said Thursday night the suspects were wanted for credit card fraud at the hotel.

The suspects, who have not been identified, crashed into a Dallas ISD school bus near the intersection of Skillman Street and Abrams Road in Dallas around 3:15 p.m.

“I was scared and I jumped out of my seat,” said fourth grader Pauvan Mung.

Two male suspects were apprehended at the scene and a female suspect was arrested later at the hotel.

There were approximately 60 children on the school bus, according to the company that operates the school district’s buses. No injuries were reported.

“We were turning left, and then the car was at maximum speed,” said fifth grader Kimberly Arreola. She says a red car hit the back left corner of the bus.

The school bus came from Hotchkiss Elementary. A different bus was sent to pick up the children and complete the route.

“We didn’t know what was happening, so the bus driver stopped and went outside and it was, like, an accident,” Mung said.

Many say it is amazing no children were hurt, but plenty were shaken and upset as they waited for their nervous parents to come pick them up. The story behind this crash was no source of comfort.

Mesquite police say staff at the Fairfield Inn at I-30 and 635 called Thursday after 2 p.m. about a group of people using a stolen credit card. When officers arrived, two suspects drove off in a red car, starting the chase that lead them to northwest Dallas. That pair was arrested after the crash, and a third suspect was handcuffed back at the hotel hours later.

By then, at the scene, the crash had been cleared and the kids had calmed down.

“I think it’s okay,” Mung said. “We are safe.”

But it’ll likely be a restless night for many of their parents, left wondering if this chase that risked their kids lives was worth it.

News 8 has filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Mesquite Police Department for a copy of their policy on police chases.

Copyright 2016 WFAA

Reposted from  WFAA

adminChase ends when suspects hit school bus in Dallas
read more

Police chase goes through golf course

No comments

ST. PAUL, Minn. – A man fleeing police was arrested after he took the officers on a chase through a St. Paul golf course.

According to St. Paul Police, a 50-year-old man was driving north on Western Avenue around 2:30 a.m. Tuesday, near Sherburne Avenue when he failed to make a complete stop at a stop sign.

View pictures of the golf course damage

Officers in a fully marked squad car turned on their emergency lights and sirens in an attempt to pull the man over. But that’s when police say he took off.

A short police chase ensued into the Phalen Park golf course, resulting in damage to holes 11 and 13.

Golfer scattering car chase under police review – ABC News

Officials say the damage wasn’t too extensive — mostly just tire tracks and ruts.

The suspect was eventually arrested inside Phalen Park.

Reposeted from KARE-11

adminPolice chase goes through golf course
read more